If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy.

What to watch after The Gilded Age

Max's dramatic period series has come to the end of it's second season. Here's what to watch next.

Carrie Coons and Donna Murphy in costume in The Gilded Age
Image credit: Max

Popverse's top stories of the day


The Gilded Age may have been one of the most watchable shows on television this year. Featuring an incredible cast of theater giants (Donna Murphy??Audra Macdonald???) and piles and piles of the most glamorous of clothes, hats, and gloves, the show has had plenty of fans loyally glued to the screen each week.

But now it's all over, and it'll be a while before a potential season 3 is available to watch... Which is probably why you're here. So, without any further ado, if you're wondering what to watch while you wait for The Gilded Age's cast of improbably beautiful people to return to the small screen, check out our guide below.

The Great

The Great screenshot
Image credit: Hulu

The Great is a wonderful television show. Not only is it hilarious, it's bold too in it's tongue-in-cheek portrayal of Catherine the Great's ascension to the throne and her early years of rule. For those who like The Gilded Age for the clothes and for the scheming, there's plenty of that in The Great, alongside some career performances from Elle Fanning and Nicholas Hoult.

Downton Abbey

Downton Abbey
Image credit: ITV

Downton Abbey is probably the most obvious show to watch after The Gilded Age, because the two shows share a creator in Julian Fellowes. The shows share a lot of similarities with dozens of plot threads, with a focus on the rich as well as their servants, and how all that drama is affected by world events and social squabbles. If you liked The Gilded Age, you'll likely enjoy Downton Abbey as well.

Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries

Promotional image for Miss Fishers Murder Mysteries
Image credit: ABC

Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries is the only show on this list that is more episodic than full-length drama. It's also, as you can probably tell from its title, a detective show. And yet, if you're drawn to The Gilded Age because you love glamorous period wear and plucky heroines, give Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries a try.

Sanditon

Promotional image for Sanditon
Image credit: PBS

Based on an unfinished novel from Jane Austen, Sanditon is more about the internal dramas and heartaches of lead Charlotte Heywood than long-time grudges and upper class wars. But, if you're looking for a period piece that is heavy on the romance and who a young woman will choose to build her life with, Sanditon's a good bet.

Bridgerton

Bridgerton
Image credit: Netflix

This seems like a bit of an obvious pick, but if you love The Gilded Age for the jockeying of social power and drama, Bridgerton might be a good next watch for you. Though Bridgerton centers romance, the social politics aspects of the show provide a lot of dramatic framework that makes the series so juicy. Not to mention, of course, the clothes.


Want to know what's coming up next in pop culture? Check out our guides to upcoming movies, upcoming TV shows, upcoming comics, and upcoming comic conventions. If you're looking for specific franchises or genres, we have all the upcoming MCU, upcoming Star Wars, upcoming Star Trek, and upcoming DC movies & TV for you. If you're a fan of superheroes and not specific to just Marvel or DC, we have overall guides to all the upcoming superhero movies and upcoming superhero TV shows (and new seasons) as well.

Follow Popverse for upcoming event coverage and news

Let Popverse be your tour guide through the wilderness of pop culture

Sign in and let us help you find your new favorite thing.

In this article
Awaiting cover image

The Gilded Age

TV show

Related topics
Max
About the Author
Tiffany Babb avatar

Tiffany Babb

Deputy Editor

Tiffany Babb is Popverse's deputy editor and resident Sondheim enthusiast. Tiffany likes stories that understand genre conventions (whether they play into them or against them), and she cries very easily at the movies— but rarely at the moments that are meant to be tearjerkers.

Comments